Hurricane Katia weakens into tropical storm

Hurricane Katia weakens into tropical storm

As of early Saturday morning, Katia was about 185 km west northwest of the Gulf Coast port of Veracruz, the NHC said.

The light damage so far is good news to national disaster officials who are already coping with the aftermath of a magnitude 8.1 quake that killed more than 60 people in southern Mexico.

The Hurricane Warning previously issued between Cabo Rojo and Laguna Verde was changed to a Tropical Storm Warning, the National Hurricane Center said.

The storm has deluged the mountainous region in Veracruz, which has a history of deadly floods and mudslides.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said the storm's maximum sustained winds had dropped Saturday morning to about 35 miles per hour.

Katia is a much smaller storm than Hurricane Irma, which is causing devastation in the Caribbean and is expected to arrive in Florida this weekend.

The storm originally made landfall just north of Tecolutla, Mexico Friday night as a Category 1 hurricane with 75 miles per hour winds. A hurricane warning means that it's expected to hit about 12-24 hours, the NHC noted in its update.

Across the country, Hurricane Katia was roaring onshore north of Tecolutla in Veracruz state, pelting the region with intense rains and winds.

Hurricane Jose continued to gather strength far out in the Atlantic and was nearing Category 5 strength as it churned about 435 miles east-southeast of the Northern Leeward Islands.

Hundreds of buildings were toppled across a number of southern states, with the hardest-hit being Juchitan and Oaxaca.